Immunization Information

All entering students are required to submit proof of required immunizations to Health Services. All students must comply with the Tuberculosis (TB) Testing Policy. Students not completing these requirements will be subject to an enrollment hold.

  1. If you are enrolling as a full or part-time student you will need to provide written documentation to Health Services of vaccination against measles, mumps and rubella (MMR). Oklahoma requires two MMR's be given after your first birthday at least one month apart. Students born in 1956 or before are exempt from this requirement. If you do not have a copy of your immunization record possible places you may be able to obtain a copy would be from the high school where you graduated, from your physician or from your local health department. If you are missing one or both of these vaccinations they may be obtained at Health Services, from your physician or from the health department. If you have a religious or moral objection to taking the vaccine you will be required to have a signed written waiver on file. If there is a medical reason why you cannot take this vaccine a written statement from your health care provider is required to be on file. Click here for more information on measles, mumps and rubella diseases and vaccination. (PDF)
  2. If you are enrolling as a full or part-time student you will need to provide written documentation to Health Services of vaccination against Hepatitis B. Hepatitis B is a serious viral infection of the liver that can cause acute or chronic illness and even death. Each year 200,000 people, mostly young adults, get infected with hepatitis B. Hepatitis B virus is spread through contact with the blood and body fluids of an infected person. Vaccination for Hepatitis B requires three separate shots given over a four to six-month period. Vaccinations may be obtained from Health Services or your health care provider. Students who are under age 18 may obtain Hepatitis B vaccinations from the health department at no cost. If you have a religious or moral objection to taking the vaccine you will be required to have a signed written waiver on file. If there is a medical reason why you cannot take this vaccine a written statement from health care provider is required to be on file. Click here for more information on Hepatitis B disease and vaccination. (PDF)
  3. If you are enrolling at SWOSU for the first time and plan to live on campus you will be required to provide written documentation to Health Services of vaccination against meningococcal disease. Vaccinations may be obtained from Health Services, your health care provider or the health department. Students who are under age 18 may obtain meningococcal vaccinations from the health department at no cost. Recommended by ACHA, CDC, & AAP, Meningococcal disease is a serious illness, caused by bacteria. Meningitis is an infection of the brain and spinal cord coverings. Meningococcal disease can also cause blood infections. About 2,600 people get meningococcal disease each year in the U.S. In spite of treatment with antibiotics, 10-15% of these people die. Of those who live, another 10% lose their arms or legs, become deaf, have problems with their nervous systems, become mentally retarded, or suffer seizures or strokes. College freshmen, particularly those who live in residence halls, have an increase risk of getting meningococcal disease. Meningococcal vaccination can prevent 2 of 3 important types of meningococcal disease in older children and adults. Vaccination against meningococcal disease consists of 1 injection. Click here for more information on meningococcal disease and vaccination. (PDF) If you choose not to take this vaccination after reviewing the information above, you will be required to have a signed written waiver on file. 

Recommended

  • Tetanus/Diphtheria - Tetanus (lockjaw) and diphtheria are serious diseases. Tetanus is caused by a germ that enters the body through a cut or wound. Diphtheria spreads when germs pass from an infected person to the nose and throat of others. Vaccination consists of at least three doses of any tetanus and diphtheria vaccine (DTP, DTaP or DT) during your lifetime with a booster every 10 years. Click here for more information on tetanus and diphtheria disease and vaccination.  http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/vis/downloads/vis-td-tdap.pdf
  • Hepatitis A - Hepatitis A is also a viral infection of the liver. It is usually spread by close contact and sometimes eating food or drinking water containing the virus. People with hepatitis A often have to be hospitalized. In rare cases, hepatitis A causes death. Hepatitis A vaccine can prevent hepatitis A. Hepatitis A vaccination consists of 2 injections given 6 to 12 months apart. Click here for more information on tetanus and diphtheria disease and vaccination.  http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/vis/downloads/vis-hep-a.pdf
  • Varicella - Chickenpox (also called varicella) is a common childhood disease. It is usually mild, but it can be serious, especially in adults. There are cases of chickenpox on campus every year and can result in 1 to 2 weeks of class absences. A varicella vaccine can prevent chickenpox. If you have not had chickenpox and have not received the vaccination, we recommend that you received it. Varicella vaccination consists of 2 injections given 4 to 6 weeks apart. Click here for more information on Varicella disease and vaccination.  http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/vis/downloads/vis-varicella.pdf
  • Influenza - Influenza is a serious disease caused by a virus that spreads from infected persons to the nose or throat of others. The "influenza season" in the U.S. is from November through April each year. Click here for more information on Influenza disease and vaccination.  http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/vis/downloads/vis-flu.pdf. Influenza vaccination is also available intranasal.