Southwestern Oklahoma State University

Distinguished Alumni

Walter Lamar

Walter E. Lamar - 2008

Walter E. Lamar served many years as a special agent for the Federal Bureau of Investigation in San Diego, San Francisco and Oklahoma City where his primary assignment was the investigation of violent crimes, bank robberies, fugitives, kidnappings, extortion, and criminal gang activity.

Highlights of his FBI career include serving six months in Seattle investigating the Green River Murder case. This individual was responsible for the killing of at least 48 women in the Pacific Northwest. While assigned to the Oklahoma City Division, he was deployed as a member of SWAT to the Branch Dravidian standoff in Waco, Texas, and three years later he responded to the bombing of the A.P. Murrah Federal Building where he participated in the rescue effort and the investigation. For his effort, he was awarded the prestigious FBI Shield of Bravery.

Lamar later earned another FBI Shield of Bravery. While attempting to determine the whereabouts of a desperate fugitive prison escapee, he became engaged in a running gun battle with the escapee. For his actions under fire, he was awarded a second Shield of Bravery, making him only one of two agents in the history of the FBI to be so awarded.

He has appeared on America’s Most Wanted and Unsolved Mysteries television programs and was featured in John Walsh’s book No Mercy. Another honor he received was in 1998 when Lamar was recognized by the American Indian Exposition in Anadarko as “Indian of the Year” in recognition of lifetime achievement.

While serving as an FBI supervisory special agent, Lamar was recruited to be the Deputy Director of the Bureau of Indian Affairs law enforcement program, which placed him in charge of Indian Country law enforcement nationwide. Understanding the Bureau of Indian Affairs falls under the umbrella of the Department of the Interior, he was called into Washington, D.C. immediately after the September 11 terrorist attack where he assisted the Department to develop protection protocols for the nation’s icons, monuments and dams. For that effort, he received a special commendation from the Secretary of the Interior.

Lamar retired from federal law enforcement nearly three years ago and formed Lamar Associates. He also recently founded Mountain Chief Institute—A Center for Tribal Excellence, which is a recognized not-for-profit organization dedicated to creating solutions for Indian Country issues.

He is an enrolled member of the Blackfeet Nation of Montana and a descendent of the Wichita Tribe of Oklahoma. He attended high school in Anadarko and then chose Southwestern Oklahoma State University to continue his higher education. After graduation, he moved to Montana and taught school on the Blackfeet Indian reservation. It was during that time he became interested in the FBI.