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Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribal College Announces Courses for Spring 2009

November 5, 2008

Several courses that will be offered by the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribal College during the 2009 spring semester have been announced.

The college, located on the campus of Southwestern Oklahoma State University in Weatherford, will have classes starting January 8, the same day classes begin at SWOSU.

Dr. Henrietta Mann, president of the CATC, said the college is a cultural-based institution of higher education. The course offerings include Cheyenne and Arapaho language courses and other culture-based courses that can lead to a minor in American Indian Studies or to an Associate of Arts Degree.

“Accountability is a hallmark of tribal ways of life, and there is no better way for students to be accountable to their ancestors than for the students to fulfill their dreams of higher education,” Mann said. “Students must remember that you are the generation honorably wearing those educational moccasins that follow in the footsteps of generations upon generations of ancestors.”

  The following course line-up represents tribal college coursework for the upcoming 2009 spring semester:

  • Don Tofpi, a retired Bureau of Indian Affair contract specialist, is scheduled to teach Self-Determination Contract II.  The course offers an insight into the process of contracts within the Tribal Government.  
  • Billy Williamson, renowned video production expert, will teach a Video Story Telling Course. Williamson provides students with a “hands on” experience in developing video stories relating to various historical and current events. 
  • Ruth Whiteskunk, Cheyenne, will continue to teach the Tsistsistas (Cheyenne) language course. Language must be taught in a cultural context so that students acquire language skills while simultaneously learning the culture of the Cheyenne people.
  • Charles Sleeper, Arapaho, will teach the Hinónóéí (Arapaho) language course.  Language is taught in a cultural context so that students acquire language skills while simultaneously learning the culture of the Arapaho people. 
  • Introduction to American Indian Studies and American Indians Today are courses that offer both historical views and contemporary relevance.

For further enrollment information, contact the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribal College at 580-774-3742.

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