Content Loading
News

SWOSU Students to Address Research at Dr. Blake Sonobe Seminar Series

Atchley

Budde

SWOSU students Bryler Atchley of Clinton and Hannah Budde of Edmond will be featured at the 3rd annual Dr. Blake Sonobe Seminar Series at Southwestern Oklahoma State University on Thursday, September 30. The public is invited.


The 3rd annual Dr. Blake Sonobe Seminar Series at Southwestern Oklahoma State University continues Thursday, September 30, featuring SWOSU students Bryler Atchley of Clinton and Hannah Budde of Edmond.

The pair will discuss their research on a bacterial plant pathogen that is capable of causing brown spots on plants like soybean, tomato, green bean and kiwi.  Brown spot reduces crop yield.

The program will be held in Wellness Center Room 221 from 6-7:30 p.m. on the SWOSU campus. Everyone is invited, and admission is free.

Both Atchley and Budde are seniors and students of Dr. Regina McGrane, associate professor in the SWOSU Biological Sciences Department. 

Atchley started working in Dr. McGrane’s laboratory in summer 2019 as part of the OK-INBRE SMaRT (Summer Mentoring and Research Training) program and participated in OK-INBRE SURP (Summer Undergraduate Research Program) this past summer. He was awarded a student research grant from the Tri Beta Biological Honor Society for 2020-2021 to support his work. He presented his research last spring at the Tri Beta South Central Region Convention and won first place for outstanding oral presentation. Atchley is currently applying for admission to medical school.

Budde started working in Dr. McGrane’s laboratory in spring 2020 as a volunteer. She also was awarded a student research grant from the Tri Beta Biological Honor Society for 2020-2021, participated in OK-INBRE SURP this past summer and presented her research last spring at the regional convention. This semester, Budde is participating in an independent study that will contribute to her Honors distinction at graduation.  She is currently working on applying for graduate school. She hopes to continue performing research in the biological sciences as she works to obtain a PhD.

Dr. McGrane involves undergraduate students in independent research projects that study the role of syringafactin in P. syringae competitive fitness.

 “These undergraduate students have ownership over their work with some freedom to pursue their own questions/ideas,” McGrane said. “Participation in research allows students to gain real experience engaging in science. Through this experience, they not only learn technical skills but also advance their understanding of biology and ability to think critically.”

McGrane said research requires a lot of writing and presentations, so students become more effective communicators throughout their experience. Collectively, these skills make them more competitive when applying for jobs and professional and graduate schools.

Zoom will be available for off-campus participants.  Go to https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_gI_DBGc4SFaPxpenamXMcA to register.